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Christopher M. Pogue, Esq.
  
Cincinnati Immigration lawyer Christopher Pogue, Esq. - Ohio Attorney, Visas, Green Card, Citizenship, Marriage, Fiance(e) Law Office of Christopher M. Pogue, 810 Sycamore Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202, usa immigration, ohio immigration, cincinnati immigration, immigration legal, best immigration lawyer, top immigration lawyer, the most reviewed and highest rated immigration attorney in the Tri-state - cases include - Marriage, K-1, Adjustment of Status, Consular Processing, Naturalization, Athletes, Entertainers, Investors, Employers, and Employees.Why hire an immigration attorney? Cincinnati Immigration Lawyer, Ohio Immigration Attorney Cincinnati Immigration Lawyer, Ohio Immigration Lawyer, K visa (Fiance(e), Marriage, Green Card, CitizenshipChristopher Pogue, Ohio lawyer, Cincinnati immigration attorney, visa, citizenship, Green Card, Marriage, Fiance(e)Family visas, Fiance visas, k-1, marriage visas, parent visas, I-130, I-485, Cincinnati Immigration Lawyer US Business visas, H1-B, PERM, Green Card, EB-1, EB-2, EB-3, EB-5, national interest waiverUseful immigration linksCincinnati Immigration Lawyer BlogContact us, Cincinnati Immigration Lawyer, Ohio Immigration Attorney
Thursday, January 31 2019
Legal immigration wait time increases 46% under Trump according to Forbes

According to Forbes -

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has found a way to make life more difficult for immigrants – make them wait longer. As a result of longer USCIS processing times, employers and high-skilled foreign nationals are less likely to view America as a great place for careers and innovation, while other foreign-born individuals wonder why treating people poorly has become official government policy.

New research from Jason Boyd, a policy counsel at the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), finds U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is “adjudicating cases at an unacceptably and increasingly slow pace.”

Boyd found the average time for USCIS to process a case increased by 46% the past two fiscal years: “Case processing times increased substantially in FY 2018 even as case receipt volume appeared to markedly decrease. . . . Viewed as a whole, USCIS’s national average processing time data reveals a legal immigration system in a tailspin.”

Read the full article by clicking here...

Posted by: Christopher Pogue, Esq AT 06:33 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
Wednesday, January 30 2019
H-1B New Final Rule Effective April 1, 2019

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) posted today for public inspection, a final rule amending regulations governing H-1B cap-subject petitions, including those that may be eligible for the advanced degree exemption.

The final rule reverses the order by which U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) selects H-1B petitions under the H-1B regular cap and the advanced degree exemption, and it introduces an electronic registration requirement for petitioners seeking to file H-1B cap-subject petitions.

The rule will be published in the Federal Register on Jan. 31, and will go into effect on April 1, though the electronic registration requirement will be suspended for the fiscal year (FY) 2020 cap season. 

Effective April 1, USCIS will first select H-1B petitions (or registrations, once the registration requirement is implemented) submitted on behalf of all beneficiaries, including those that may be eligible for the advanced degree exemption. USCIS will then select from the remaining eligible petitions, a number projected to reach the advanced degree exemption.

Changing the order in which USCIS counts these allocations will likely increase the number of petitions for beneficiaries with a master’s or higher degree from a U.S. institution of higher education to be selected under the H-1B numerical allocations. Specifically, the change will result in an estimated increase of up to 16% (or 5,340 workers) in the number of selected petitions for H-1B beneficiaries with a master’s degree or higher from a U.S. institution of higher education.

USCIS will begin accepting H-1B cap petitions for FY 2020 on April 1, 2019. The reverse selection order will apply to petitions filed for the FY 2020 H-1B cap season. Petitioners may file an H-1B petition no more than six months before the employment start date requested for the beneficiary. USCIS will provide H-1B cap filing instruction on uscis.gov in advance of the filing season.

Posted by: Christopher Pogue, Esq AT 09:47 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Tuesday, January 08 2019
Updated Naturalization N-400 Questions for 2019

Are you preparing for the naturalization test? As you study for the U.S. history and government (civics) test, make sure that you know the most current answers to these questions. 

Periodically, answers to the civics test change to reflect the results of federal and state elections and appointments or to clarify content and ensure consistency in terminology. The revised answers to the questions below are effective immediately.

Question Update
20. Who is one of your state’s U.S. Senators now?

The answer to this question may change as the result of elections, appointments, or retirements.

Give the name of one of your state’s current U.S. senators. For a list of current members of the U.S. Senate, please visit senate.gov.

Answers will vary. [District of Columbia residents and residents of U.S. territories should answer that D.C. (or the territory where the applicant lives) has no U.S. senators.]

23. Name your U.S. Representative.

The answer to this question may change as the result of elections, appointments, or retirements.

Give the name of your current U.S. representative. For a list of current members of the U.S. House of Representatives, please visit house.gov.

Answers will vary. [Residents of territories with nonvoting delegates or resident commissioners may provide the name of that delegate or commissioner. Also acceptable is any statement that the territory has no (voting) representatives in Congress.]

43. Who is the Governor of your state now?

The answer to this question may change as the result of elections, appointments, or retirements, depending on inauguration dates.

Give the name of your state’s current governor. For a list of current governors, please visit usa.gov/states-and-territories

Answers will vary. [District of Columbia residents should answer that D.C. does not have a governor.]

47. What is the name of the Speaker of the House of Representatives now?

The House of Representatives generally elects the speaker of the House on the first day of every new Congress. The answer to this question may change after the election.

Give the name of the current speaker of the House. Visit uscis.gov/citizenship/testupdatesfor the name of the speaker of the House of Representatives.

Posted by: Christopher Pogue, Esq AT 10:25 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
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The Pogue Law Firm LLC
Of Counsel with the Fleischer Law Firm LLC
810 Sycamore Street, 2nd Floor - Cincinnati, Ohio 45202            



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