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Cincinnati Immigration lawyer Christopher Pogue, Esq. - Ohio Attorney, Visas, Green Card, Citizenship, Marriage, Fiance(e) Law Office of Christopher M. Pogue, 810 Sycamore Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202, usa immigration, ohio immigration, cincinnati immigration, immigration legal, best immigration lawyer, top immigration lawyer, the most reviewed and highest rated immigration attorney in the Tri-state - cases include - Marriage, K-1, Adjustment of Status, Consular Processing, Naturalization, Athletes, Entertainers, Investors, Employers, and Employees.Why hire an immigration attorney? Cincinnati Immigration Lawyer, Ohio Immigration Attorney Cincinnati Immigration Lawyer, Ohio Immigration Lawyer, K visa (Fiance(e), Marriage, Green Card, CitizenshipChristopher Pogue, Ohio lawyer, Cincinnati immigration attorney, visa, citizenship, Green Card, Marriage, Fiance(e)Family visas, Fiance visas, k-1, marriage visas, parent visas, I-130, I-485, Cincinnati Immigration Lawyer US Business visas, H1-B, PERM, Green Card, EB-1, EB-2, EB-3, EB-5, national interest waiverUseful immigration linksCincinnati Immigration Lawyer BlogContact us, Cincinnati Immigration Lawyer, Ohio Immigration Attorney
Tuesday, June 23 2020
Travel Ban on Legal Employment and Family Immigration Expanded and Extended until 2021

Families, including those with US citizen children, are being separated. Business will suffer significantly.

No respectable democracy in the world is doing this. Why is the US doing this? Japan's unemployment rate is less than 3% right now. What do you think the US unemployment rate is right now?

Who you vote for matters. Hindsight is 20-20. When you elect a clown, don't be surprised if your country becomes a joke.

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President Trump issued a proclamation continuing Proclamation 10014 of April 22, 2020, and suspending and limiting the entry of any individual seeking entry pursuant to any of the following nonimmigrant visas:

(a) an H-1B or H-2B visa, and any individual accompanying or following to join such individual;

(b) a J visa, to the extent the individual is participating in an intern, trainee, teacher, camp counselor, au pair, or summer work travel program, and any individual accompanying or following to join such individual; and

(c) an L visa, and any individual accompanying or following to join such individual.

The proclamation shall apply only to any individual who:

(i) is outside the United States on the effective date of this proclamation;

(ii) does not have a nonimmigrant visa that is valid on the effective date of this proclamation; and

(iii) does not have an official travel document other than a visa (such as a transportation letter, an appropriate boarding foil, or an advance parole document) that is valid on the effective date of this proclamation or issued on any date thereafter that permits him or her to travel to the United States and seek entry or admission.

The suspension and limitation on entry pursuant to section 2 of this proclamation shall not apply to:

(i) any lawful permanent resident of the United States;

(ii) any individual who is the spouse or child, as defined in section 101(b)(1) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1101(b)(1)), of a United States citizen;

(iii) any individual seeking to enter the United States to provide temporary labor or services essential to the United States food supply chain; and

(iv) any individual whose entry would be in the national interest as determined by the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, or their respective designees.

For the purposes of determining who is covered under the “national interest” exemption, the Proclamation directs the Secretaries of State, Labor, and Homeland Security to determine standards for those to whom such an exemption would be available, including any individuals who:

• are critical to the defense, law enforcement, diplomacy, or national security of the United States;

• are involved with the provision of medical care to individuals who have contracted COVID-19 and are currently hospitalized;

• are involved with the provision of medical research at U.S. facilities to help the United States combat COVID-19;

• are necessary to facilitate the immediate and continued economic recovery of the United States; or

• are children who would age out of eligibility for a visa because of this proclamation or Proclamation 10014.

Discretion: The consular officer has discretion to determine if an individual is within one of the exempted categories outlined above.

The proclamation is effective immediately, and shall expire on December 31, 2020, and may be continued.

Posted by: Christopher M. Pogue, Esq AT 07:56 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Wednesday, June 10 2020
How to Feed Crowds in a Protest or Pandemic in America? The Sikhs Know

Their centuries-old faith tradition of nourishing anyone in need has found new energy and purpose in America’s turmoil.

Many Sikh's first arrived in the America as Asylum Seekers starting in the 1980's, and more recently through traditional family and employment immigration routes.

An essential part of Sikhism is langar, the practice of preparing and serving a free meal to promote the Sikh tenet of seva, or selfless service. Anyone, Sikh or not, can visit a gurdwara and partake in langar, with the biggest ones — like the Golden Temple in Amritsar, India — serving more than 100,000 people every day.

The Sikhs’ biggest challenge isn’t keeping up with demand. It’s letting people know that they’re here — without making a big show of it or proselytizing, which is forbidden.

At least 80 gurdwaras in the United States are now providing food assistance. For many, the transition has been quick and seamless.

At many gurdwaras in the United States, most of those who show up for langar meals are Sikhs. Now that they are catering to a broader population, menus have changed to suit different tastes. In the Seattle area, volunteers at the Gurudwara Sacha Marag Sahib are making pasta and tacos in addition to rice and dal.

“The concept of langar is to serve the needy,” Mr. Pal Singh said. Before the pandemic, he said, most people participating in langar were local Sikhs coming more for social and religious reasons than out of need. The drive-through and deliveries will allow them to put meals into the hands of people who struggle to afford to eat.

Read the full article here at the NYTimes...

Posted by: How to Feed Crowds in a ProtestChristopher M. Pogue, Esq AT 07:24 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
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The Pogue Law Firm LLC
Of Counsel with the Fleischer Law Firm LLC
810 Sycamore Street, 2nd Floor - Cincinnati, Ohio 45202            



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